Safety & Comfort Tips for RVing with Pets

Dogs on the road

Your pets are part of your family, and that means you don’t want to leave them behind when you hit the road. Having your pets on your RV travels is undeniably enjoyable for you, but it’s important to make sure the experience is just as safe and enjoyable for your pet. These simply tips will help you reduce your pets’ anxiety when you embark on an adventure in your RV.

Before You Go

RV travel means more time on the road than usual for your pet. Have your best friend checked out by your vet before you hit the road to ensure he or she is fit for travel. Young pets, elderly ones and those with health issues may be safer staying with a friend or family member than living life on the road.

Talk to your vet about your travel plans, and he or she can inform you of the shots or other preparations your pet may need before he hits the road. Make sure all of your furry friend’s vaccinations are up to date and keep current health records in your RV in case of an emergency.

Pack for Your Furry Friend

Packing for your pet is just as important as packing for yourself. Make sure your pet is outfitted with up-to-date tags with your current phone number and don’t forget to pack a spare collar, leashes, bowls, food, prescription medications and plenty of water.

Your pet may not immediately feel at home in your RV, which can cause anxiety, so be sure to bring along your furry friend’s favorite toys, beds, blankets and other items he likes to cuddle up with at home.

Take Plenty of Breaks

Many road warriors like to get to their destination quickly with very few stops, but you can’t do that when you have a pet on board. Stop every couple of hours to let your pet relieve himself and have a drink of water. The saying, “A tired dog is a good dog,” is true on the road, so be sure to exercise your pet at every stop.

Keep Your Pet Relaxed

Travel can cause pets anxiety, because they’re away from all of the familiarity that they love. Bring some of your pet’s favorite toys, a dog bed, a blanket, and a couple of bones for the ride. These familiar items will help your pet relax and make a new home inside your RV.

Avoid Sickness

Dogs can get motion sickness just like people do. If your pet is prone to car sickness, avoid feeding him before you get in the car. Give him plenty of water when you’re on the road, and feed him when you arrive at your destination.

Familiarize Yourself with the Area

When you’re in a new, unfamiliar place, take some time to learn about your surroundings. It’s important to know if there are unsafe areas for your pet or even unsafe foods he could get into. Make sure the area you’re visiting is pet-friendly, so you’re not caught by surprise.

Visit CCRV

Remember to stop by and see us at CCRV before you hit the road this spring. Give us a call or stop in and see us to set up your service appointment.

Tips for Handling Dishes in Your RV

Dirty dishes in your RV

One of the perks of RV travel is that you’ve always got a kitchen available for when you feel like making a meal. It helps save money and control your portions, both of which are highly beneficial on a long RV trip. You know what’s not highly beneficial? Dirty dishes. This is especially true in an RV. At home, you’ve got a little bit of wiggle room to allow your messes to sit for a bit. In an RV when space is limited, you can’t very well let dishes pile up. But, on the other hand, you don’t want to spend copious amounts of time processing dirty plates, pans, and utensils either.

Here’s how to cook in your RV and minimize/handle the dishes you create as efficiently as possible.

Minimize the Dishes You Create

One of the best ways to deal with dishes is to minimize how many you create in the first place. Try making recipes that call for just one pot rather than multiple pots, pans, and skillets. You can also hand wash any dish that was lightly used and put it right back into the cabinet after you’re done with it. If you just throw it into the sink with everything else, you’ll feel compelled to give it a more thorough cleaning that it didn’t really need.

Make Use of Disposable Plates and Utensils

This one will impact your budget a bit and isn’t as green as other options, but used strategically, it can drastically reduce the number of dishes you produce over the course of the day. There’s a good middle ground where you only use the disposable plates and utensils for some meals rather than all of them. They’re especially useful for meals that are highly messy and that leave a lot of residue that might be hard to clean later. If you eat off a disposable plate, the mess can just go in the trash instead.

Save on Water

As an RVer, you’ve got a finite amount of water at any one time. Sure, you can always get more, but why waste water when you don’t have to? At home you may be used to rinsing your dishes under running water, but in your RV you ought to consider filling your sink with warm, soapy water and using that to soak your dishes instead.

Wash Your Dishes Immediately

The best way to manage your dishes, however, is to simply do them as quickly after a meal as possible. Even if you’re doing everything else to mitigate your pile of dishes, this one’s the most crucial. After every meal, take time to rinse your dishes. If no one in your RV likes to do this task, just make it a chore that rotates. That way it’s fair and no one can complain when it’s their turn to wash the dishes after a meal.

Visit CCRV

Remember to stop by and see us at CCRV before you hit the road this spring. Give us a call or stop in and see us to set up your service appointment.

Spring Cleaning Tips for Your RV

Spring cleaning your RV supplies.

The spring travel season has begun and that means there’s no better time to do some RV spring cleaning than now. Before you hit the road for your upcoming adventures, use these helpful spring cleaning tips to ensure your RV is ready for another travel season.

Start with the Exterior

Washing the exterior of your RV is one of the best ways to determine if it suffered any damages in the winter months. Examine your motorhome, travel trailer, or fifth wheel’s exterior top to bottom in search of cracks, separations, and gas or other fluid leaks.

When washing the exterior of your RV, use a specially-formulated RV soap and a hose with a power nozzle. Make sure your towels and sponges are debris-free before use. Wash your RV in the shade to avoid pesky window streaks.

Move to the Interior

After your RV’s exterior is clean, move into the interior and clean it thoroughly as you would in your house. Dust and wipe down all flat surfaces, vacuum all carpets, sweep and mop all tile floors, and clean the inside of your windows. Remove any expired food that you may have forgotten to remove before winter. Wash any linens. While you clean, be sure to keep an eye out for any pests that may have infiltrated your RV.

Do a Home Safety Check

A home safety check is necessary before hitting the road. Test the batteries in your carbon monoxide detectors and smoke alarms and check your fire extinguishers to ensure they’re in a convenient location and in proper working condition. While performing your home safety check, remove any excess items from the interior of your RV, including supplies you no longer use or ones that are only needed in the winter months.

Review Your RV One More Time

Before you hit the road, it’s important to make sure all of your RV’s accessories and appliances are in proper working order. Check your tires for cracks or damages or have our certified service professionals determine whether or not they should be replaced.

Stock up on all of the supplies you need for entertaining, cooking and cleaning, so you’re prepared for all of your upcoming spring and summer adventures.

Visit CCRV

The best way to ensure that your RV is ready for the road is to bring it to our certified RV technicians at CCRV. Give us a call or stop in and see us to set up your service appointment.

Food Shopping and Packing Tips for Your RV

Grocery shopping tips for your RV.

Packing your clothes, toiletries, and electronics into your RV is easy. There’s little difference between packing those for an RV or car. Figuring out your food situation, though, can be a real head scratcher. Buying groceries is unique to an RV trip, so it takes some figuring out. Here are some tips to take into account when you’re buying and packing your foods for your next RV trip.

Don’t Overstuff Your Fridge or Pantry

There’s a definite temptation to get super-intensive with your pre-trip grocery shopping, but there are a number of reasons why you ought to restrain yourself. For starters, you don’t want to stock up on perishables and then fail to get through them. While you travel, there’s a better than good chance that you’re going to dine out more than you do when you’re at home,  making it less likely that you’ll be able to eat everything that you stock if you shop like you do at home.

Not to mention that, while you travel, you’re going to encounter situations where there’s some sort of unique and delicious local specialty food that you’re going to want to have room for. Maybe you find an orchard with incredible fruit or a bakery that makes the best pastries in a three hundred mile radius. Regardless, you’re going to want to have room for all of your finds.

Things Are Going to Shift, Slide, and Roll

An incontrovertible truth with RV travel is that anything and everything that’s light and unsecured is likely going to shift, slide, or roll while you travel, even if you’re taking it slow and driving in a straight line. Your food is no exception, so be sure to keep this in mind when you’re packing your groceries into your RV’s pantry and fridge. One way to help your pantry is to buy bins and containers and place your food packages into those, especially the fragile foods and containers. Then you can wedge these containers against one another inside the pantry to prevent things from shifting too much. While it makes it a bit more difficult to quickly grab stuff from your pantry, it’s preferable to having things break while you travel.

Minimize Your Fridge and Freezer Items

By all means, use your RV’s fridge and freezer, but try to find as many shelf stable foods as possible while keeping the quantities of your refrigerated items down. Choose smaller cartons of milk, don’t buy as many yogurts, and only buy as much meat as you’re likely to eat within the next few days. If you plan to stop somewhere, like an RV park, for an extended amount of time, you can buy more fridge items, but if you’re moving frequently your fridge can get a bit too warm, which is only exacerbated if your fridge is overly full.

Visit CCRV

Are you looking for the perfect RV to travel throughout Texas (and beyond) this spring and summer? There’s no better place to start your RV lifestyle than at CCRV — your No. 1 South Texas RV dealer. With everything from simple camping supplies to RV parts, maintenance and sales, we’ve got all of your Texas RV needs covered under one roof.

Make Meals Ahead of Time

When you’re RVing, it’s hard to slow down and do stuff like cook a meal. Good thing that RVers have gotten inventive about reducing work when it comes to meal prep. If you want to save money, avoid eating fast food and frozen dinners, and generally enjoy your meals more, try making stuff ahead of time. It’s a tried and true method right up there with slow cooker recipes on effectiveness and ease. When you’ve got a spare moment, whether before you leave on your trip or just when you’ve got some downtime on the road, take the time to prepare some meals ahead of time so that you’ve got options when you’re feeling a bit lazy.

FREEZER BREAKFAST BURRITOS

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large onion diced
  • 1 large green pepper diced
  • 1 roll of breakfast sausage
  • 1 pound of bacon
  • 1 pound of red potatoes cubed small
  • 16 oz shredded cheddar cheese
  • 12 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 pack flour tortillas

DIRECTIONS

  1. Fry up the bacon until crisp. Let it cool and chop it into small pieces.
  2. Fry up the breakfast sausage with the onion and green pepper. Strain the grease and let cool.
  3. Preheat oven to 375℉. Toss the cubed potatoes in salt and pepper to taste and paprika. Spread potatoes on a baking sheet and bake for 15 min. Take potatoes out and flip them with a spatula. Bake in the oven for another 15 minutes or until soft and browned. Let potatoes cool.
  4. Crack eggs into medium bowl and add milk. Whisk until light and fluffy. Heat a frying pan over medium heat and spray with cooking spray. Pour eggs into pan and scramble until cooked through. Remove eggs from pan and let cool.
  5. Lay one tortilla down flat. Add cheese, eggs, potatoes and meat with peppers and onions. Fold the bottom of the tortilla up then fold the right side in. Fold the top down and the left side in. Lay the burrito seam-side down on a baking sheet. Once you have completed all of the burritos, place the baking sheet in the freezer for 1 hour. Wrap each burrito in tin foil and place in a large plastic bag and store in your cooler.
  6. When you are ready to eat them you can place them into the outer coals of the campfire or on top of the fire grate.

SHRIMP BOIL FOIL PACKETS

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 (12.8-ounce) package smoked andouille sausage, thinly sliced
  • 2 ears corn, each cut crosswise into 4 pieces
  • 1 pound baby red potatoes, halved
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 teaspoons cajun seasoning
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat a gas or charcoal grill over high heat.
  2. Cut four sheets of foil, about 12-inches long. Divide shrimp, sausage, corn and potatoes into 4 equal portions and add to the center of each foil in a single layer.
  3. Fold up all 4 sides of each foil packet. Add olive oil, cajun seasoning, salt and pepper, to taste; gently toss to combine. Fold the sides of the foil over the shrimp, covering completely and sealing the packets closed.
  4. Place in fridge until you’re ready to make them. When ready, place foil packets on the grill and cook until just cooked through, about 12-15 minutes.
  5. Served immediately, garnished with parsley, if desired.

Start Your Camping Trip at CCRV

Before you hit the roads for your next RV adventure, bring your RV to CCRV in Corpus Christi. We specializing in servicing, repairing and upgrading your RV, so you can enjoy the safest and most comfortable camping experience yet.

Tips on Packing Your RV

When packing your RV, it’s no secret that most RVs lack abundant storage space, but that doesn’t mean you can’t create your own storage solutions to get the most into your rig. In fact, RV enthusiasts have been coming up with creative storage solutions since they started hitting the roads in travel trailers, fifth wheels and motorhomes. The following are a few of the best options for packing your RV better by creating more storage space in your home on wheels.

Add Shelves to Kitchen Cabinets

Much of your RV cabinet space is being wasted right now. Without shelves, the upper half of each cabinet is probably left empty. Add an additional shelve or two to each of your cabinets using a large metal shelf from the home improvement store. Placing your food, dishes and other items in plastic bins on the shelves will also help prevent spillage.

Opt for Stacking Dishes When Possible

As many people turn toward minimizing with smaller living spaces, more RV-friendly products are created. Travelers can now buy stackable plates, cups, and mixing bowls that take up minimal space inside RV cabinets. Opt for stackable items whenever possible to create more room for the other things you wish to bring on your travels.

Use Vacuum Bags

There are plenty of items in your RV that probably don’t get as much use as others. Extra sheets, blankets, beach towels and winter clothing may not need to take up space inside your RV year-round. Use vacuum bags to compress those large linens and unused clothing, so you can travel with them without taking up too much precious space.

Use Netting for Wall Storage

Netting is an ideal storage solution for bulky or oddly-shaped items. Attach storage nets to your walls to store sporting equipment, shoes and other items that can be difficult to store in other areas. Storage nets can be purchased on Amazon.com or found at most big box stores.

Visit CCRV

Upgrade your RV’s storage spaces with a number of handy items from our CCRV online parts store. Shop 24 hours a day and seven days a week.

RV Security Tips

RVing is about enjoying the RV, your friends and family, and the open road. You don’t want to worry about the negative or dwell on what can go wrong.

And you shouldn’t have to. By taking some basic precautionary steps, you can help to safeguard the things that matter to you when you’re out on the road and gain some peace of mind, but still have fun.

Keep Your Valuables Stowed Away

While theft of your RV is a concern, oftentimes a break-in will occur simply to steal a valuable item that can be seen through the window. Whenever you leave your RV alone, take a moment to assess the items you have out that may be attractive to a burglar, such as laptop computers, tablets, jewelry, and other valuables. Stow these and similar items out of sight when you leave by placing them in bags, cases, cabinets, drawers, or even under a jacket or towel. By eliminating incentives for a break-in, you eliminate the chances that one will occur. If you have items that can be used to compromise your identity, such as passports or social security cards, consider a safe or lock box.

 

Lock It Up

While it may seem like an obvious suggestion, it can be easy to overlook, especially if you’re having a good time and potential misfortune is far from your mind. Locking up is a simple precaution that you should practice regardless of how long you’ll be leaving your RV out of sight. Even if you’re just taking a short hike or heading to the nearby lake for a swim, make sure you lock up every point of access and double check to make sure it’s securely closed. Take all keys with you and don’t trust a copy of your keys to anyone you don’t know.

Research Your Destinations

While you’re probably already researching hours of operation, directions, prices, and RV amenities, you may want to add an additional point to your checklist: crime rate. Whether your destination is urban or rural, it’s good to know how safe an area you plan to visit is. Avoiding crime-prone areas is the best defense against burglary and break-ins. By staying to areas with low crime rates, you significantly reduce the chance of being a victim.

Ensure That Your RV is Equipped to Handle Fires

Not every threat comes from strangers – fire is a valid concern to any RVer and can quickly destroy your property if you have no plan in place to address it. By simply equipping your RV with fire extinguishers and smoke detectors, you can drastically reduce the risk of a fire getting out of control. Setup an inspection schedule to check that your extinguishers and smoke detectors are operational and effective.

Visit CCRV

Thinking of buying a new RV or renting one for your family to enjoy this holiday season? Stop by CCRV for the best prices on new and used RVs, rentals and much more.

Decorating Your RV for the Holidays

CCRV is the holiday place to be for new and used Forest River, Keystone, Rockwood, Fleetwood, Gulf Stream, and more, recreational vehicles. This holiday season, take a look at their inventory and envision how you’d deck the halls of your own RV.

The holidays bring forth the opportunity to go over-the-top with innovative and creative decorating. Just because you’re on the road doesn’t mean you can’t share in the festivities of lighting up your home with holiday cheer.

Interior

The sky’s the limit with indoor decorating. Even though you’re working with a smaller space, utilizing every available area will make a cozy holiday home. Consider these popular ideas that are both quick and easy.

  • Liven up the dashboard with ornaments, tinsel, wooden ornaments, candy canes, and stick on stars.
  • If kids are aboard, let them make cutout decorations with lots of glitter to hang in the passenger windows.
  • Set up a traditional Christmas tree. Use a live cut tree, potted Norfolk pine or other variety, or an artificial tree bedecked with an assortment of ornaments.
  • Hang a decorative live or artificial wreath on the inside of the front door.
  • Place garlands and greenery – live pieces of holly and pinecones – or artificial pieces throughout the RV.
  • Poinsettias are a tradition during the holidays. Have an assortment of red, white, and pink plants on tables and beside the door. Flowering Christmas cactus are easy to maintain and provide colorful blossoms for the season.
  • Scented candles and seasonal potpourri add the right “spice” to the interior.

Exterior

Make a statement with your own signature decorating ideas. Give other campers an eyeful with seasonal decor that will put everyone in a joyous mood.

  • Let passerbys know you’re celebrating with a festive wreath hung on the RVs front grill.
  • Hang sparkling lights around the outside of the RV including awnings, doors and windows.
  • Place a variety decorations throughout the campsite such as ornaments hung from awning supports.
  • Use blow-up Christmas characters, animated reindeer, and luminaria displays.
  • Place a holiday themed welcome mat beside the front door.

Visit CCRV

Before starting your travel plans, CCRV can give your RV the once over to be sure everything is in working order. Contact our staff for an appointment. While you’re at the center, take a look at the new and used models available for future upgrades.

RV Trip Planning Tips

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RV season is definitely still going and RVers across the country are prepping for their next road trip. If you need some help planning out your next trip, a list of dos and don’ts is always helpful.

Before you start, make a list of things you know you need to put into the RV to get it ready. If you’re taking your rig out for the first time in a while, stop by the service department at CCRV to have the service techs get it ready for your first trip. While your RV is at CCRV, have the techs check to be sure everything is working properly. If you have a motorized RV, have the techs test drive it and check the engine, brakes, suspension, and other critical components.

Once you’re done with that, go through it and finish your list of needed things to get ready for the season. Your list should include:

  • Canned goods and dry goods.
  • Dishes, pots, pans, silverware, cooking utensils. Don’t forget the can opener!
  • Sheet, blankets and pillows. If these were stored in plastic in the RV, wash them before you make up the beds.
  • Cleaning fluids.
  • Chemical for the black tank.
  • RV toilet paper.
  • A dishpan. Instead of filling the gray tank with dishwater, you can use a dishpan in the sink, and then throw the dishwater outside.
  • If your RV has a washer and dryer, be sure to stock the laundry room with detergent and softener.
  • Small vacuum if the RV has carpets. If not, you can use a vacuum or a broom.
  • Lighter or matches.
  • Hatchet/axe.
  • Hammer and other small hand tools.
  • First aid kit.
  • Propane.

Once you have the basics, all you need to do is to add perishables and other things you would normally pack at the last minute.

Some people may like to take off without making plans and play it by ear, but if you are the type who needs to plan everything ahead, make sure you make reservations well ahead of time, especially if you know a popular campground tends to sell out quickly. If you wait until a week or two before you leave, you may not get into the facility you prefer.

Visit CCRV

Stop by CCRV well in advance of your trip to pick up any needed items such as tank chemicals, organizational accessories, and replacement parts.

Thanksgiving Dinner in Your RV

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Taking a trip in your RV over the holidays doesn’t mean you need to skip Thanksgiving dinner or eat it at a dingy roadside restaurant. Although the space may be a little tighter than at home, you’ve got all of the tools you need to cook a lavish meal right there in your motor home. It doesn’t have to be stressful either; get the whole family involved and let the great outdoors provide a backdrop for your best Thanksgiving yet.

The Turkey

Although a turkey may seem way too large to cook in your RV’s oven, there are a few alternative routes you can take to ensure the Thanksgiving turkey makes it to the table. You can always deep fry or grill your turkey, but this means you’re forced to bring a grill and turkey fryer with you. The best alternative to carrying around extra cargo is to buy turkey breasts instead of a full turkey. Bake them in your RV’s oven for that traditional baked Thanksgiving turkey taste.

Grocery Shopping

It may seem obvious to stock your RV’s fridge with all of the supplies for Thanksgiving dinner before you hit the road, but if you’ve got a few days in the vehicle before the holiday, early shopping isn’t such a great idea. If you’re headed to an area that will have grocery stores nearby, stop at one near your destination. Frozen pies can thaw and fresh breads can go stale after days of travel.

Use All of Your Options

It seems like most Thanksgiving dinner fixings are cooked in the oven, but this is where you need to get creative. Choose side dishes that can be successfully cooked on the stove, in the microwave or even in a crockpot if you travel with one. If you have an outdoor kitchen, use it in addition to your interior RV kitchen, and don’t be afraid to buy a couple of fresh dishes from the supermarket’s deli if you’re short on cooking space.

Visit CCRV

Thinking of buying a new RV or renting one for your family to enjoy this holiday season? Stop by CCRV for the best prices on new and used RVs, rentals and much more.